Read All About It: Fall ’13 Trinity Magazine

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The fall 2013 issue of Trinity Magazine hit the shelf in early October. Here’s the table of contents (of feature articles):

    • “The Legacy of Carl F. H. Henry: An Evangelical’s Evangelical”
      —an article that highlights the trajectory of Henry’s legacy, particularly as it relates to the history of Trinity

Evangelicals can “still make gains that exceed any made this side of the apostolic age, including the Reformation,” Henry said, pointing to the absolute necessity of vigorous engagement with the world, submitted to the living Word of God. “But they will come only in the context of the bended knee and the throbbing heart.”

 

    • “Shaped or Being Shaped? Interacting with Emerging Adults”
      —Associate Professor of Christian Ministries Jana Sundene lays out several bits of wise advice when it comes to mentoring emerging adults

We need a plan for how to journey alongside young adults who have a deep spiritual and relation al hunger but have too often felt themselves a bit alienated by the local church.

~ Jana Sundene, p. 13

 

    • “Partnerships: Answers to the Problems Facing Short-Term Missions”
      —TC alumna Bethany Kemming (’13) explores the plethora of partnerships that Trinity has developed over the years in its effort to participate in meaningful short-term missions that help more than hurt

Through these partnerships, Trinity’s missions department also aims for mutual benefit—of Trinity and the partnership organization. A focus on mutual benefit has helped guide each trip’s activities and goals. In certain circumstances, this means that Trinity’s team will forego doing what they think needs to be done and instead ask the partner where they desire help.

~  Bethany Kemming, p. 21

 

    • “The Word of God and the Widow’s Plight”
      —this brief article tells the story of alumni Bulus (PhD ’95) and Rose (Phd ’05) Galadema’s service in Nigeria to the church and the ‘least of these’

The Galadema’s credit two former TEDS professors, Linda Cannell and Ted Ward, for helping them learn that “if you really want the program to be successful, instead of assuming you know what the people’s needs are, sit with them, and you might be surprised,” Bulus said. “Just sit with them and then ask them, ‘What are your needs, how can we come alongside you?’ (p. 23)

 
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