Grudem on Christians & Government

God&Politics

TIU’s Gospel in the Public Square (GPS) welcomed back former TEDS professor Dr. Wayne Grudem on Tuesday, October 8, for a lecture entitled, “Should Christians Influence the Cultural Institution of the Government?”

Gospel in the Public Square is an on-campus ministry dedicated to giving the TIU community—as well as the surrounding community—the opportunity to listen to a variety of speakers, including Dr. Grudem. One of the founders of GPS is Brandon Myers, a third-year Masters in Divinity student and assistant pastor of Our Savior Evangelical Free Church in Wheeling. Myers said that GPS seeks to present the public with answers to the question of how to biblically engage pressing issues.

“As Christians, we participate in good works to be obedient, to honor and glorify God, to love our neighbor and to live lives of gratitude to our Lord and Savior,” Myers said. “The question is how do we do this in light of so many problems across the globe and in our culture?”

According to Myers, the purpose of GPS is to challenge Christians to think through and take action on significant cultural issues, and, in turn, be better ambassadors for Jesus Christ. They invited Dr. Grudem to share how the church can find biblical stability in their ever-changing relationship with the government.

For his lecture, Dr. Grudem drew much of his material from his 2010 book Politics According to the Bible, in which he shares both basic principles and specific issues that the church must reconsider in their interactions with culture and the government. He spent most of the discussion detailing the first chapter of the book, which lists five views about the relationship between the church and the government that he believes are incorrect (the remainder of the book gets into specific issues about which Christians from across the spectrum often disagree). He then offered a better way for us to consider: Christians can and should have significant influence on government.

Dr. Grudem taught at TEDS from 1981 to 2001 and was the chairman of the Biblical and Systematic Theology Department in his final 14 years. He is now a research professor of Theological and Biblical Studies at the Phoenix Seminary in Arizona, has written over 20 books—including Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine—and was the general editor of the 2009 version of the ESV Study Bible.

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