Global Christian Week Recap

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by Sean Gilbert, Trinity Digest staff writer

 

Booths promoting missions agencies in the Waybright Center. | Photo by Sean Gilbert

Diversely decorated booths in the Waybright Center and McLennan, missionaries from all sorts of different ministries speaking in classrooms, and hand-out pamphlets decked out in the hallways.

It must be Global Christian Week at Trinity International University.

In previous years, missionaries join Christian Ministries and Biblical Studies classes to discuss their ministry and opportunities to serve people of that particular culture.

“We have a number of speakers lined up, two for each session of Intro to Ministry this week,” Christian Ministries professor Dr. Greg Carlson said. “I am also having a very experienced ReachGlobal guest, David Rofkahr, share in my class about a worldwide perspective of God.”

From serving the hungry in Africa to youth ministry for children who live on military bases, Trinity students hear about many different opportunities to find a niche in ministry.

“I’ve known a couple of people who have come in contact with their calling in ministry during Global Christian Week,” Christian Ministry student Adam Sivertsen said.

While Christian Ministry majors have great opportunities presented to them through guest speakers, other majors have not been as fortunate. In the past, other majors have not scheduled speakers or tried to relate Global Christian Week back to what their students are studying.

Trinity senior and Communication major Jennine Blasing has noticed this difference in the past.

“It has always seemed like a Christian Ministry or Biblical Studies week, rather than including other majors,” Blasing said.

Carlson believes that Global Christian Week “gives all students an opportunity to see the global reach of their chosen field in the endeavor to touch people for God’s sake around the world and across the street”. However, he admits that the week is geared more towards those studying Christian Ministries and Biblical Studies.

“I suppose Christian Ministry students have perhaps a greater interest because they can trace what they are studying about discipleship and relational ministry directly to what our Global Christian Week guests are saying,” Carlson said.

This year, the heads of other departments are striving to make this week different for their students, inviting missionaries to speak in their classes. For example, Communication Professor Dr. Kristin Lindholm invited a speaker to her Interpersonal Communication class. Students noticed this new effort to incorporate their major in Global Christian Week activities.

“Before, I never felt like Global Christian Week was for me,” Blasing said. “But this week, I’ve already heard a couple of speakers in class. I can be in business or communication and still be a missionary.”

Global Christian Week serves students well in helping them understand the importance of intercultural mission work and having a global perspective in spreading the gospel. According to Carlson, one of his greatest memories of Global Christian Week was when a guest shared about youth ministry in cross-cultural settings.

“This prompted several responses,” Carlson said. “Some youth workers aimed their studies to being cross-cultural youth pastors, while a few others started to become much more informed about how to get their youth groups to think about global ministries. These relationships are some of the benefits having something like Global Christian Week on our campus.”

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